Consumer protection



When you buy goods or services in Australia, including those bought online, you have rights under the Australian Consumer Law. For example, you have the right to receive accurate and truthful information about the products and services you buy. If something goes wrong with a product you’ve bought because it is faulty, you have rights to a repair, replacement or refund. You have the right to expect that a product is safe for use. There are rules that traders must follow over the phone or if they come to your house, such as leaving if you ask them to.

If you have a problem with a purchase, contact the consumer protection agency in your state or territory for information about your rights and options. They can help you with problems relating to renting and accommodation, buying or selling a home, building and renovating, buying a car, shopping, warranties, lay-bys, refunds, credit and trading. They may be able to conduct a conciliation (negotiation) between you and the seller to resolve a problem.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) protects Australians against unfair business practices in pricing, anti-competitive and unfair market practices, and product safety.

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Ombudsman offices are independent authorities that investigate complaints about government organisations and private companies in some industries. They can take action to stop unlawful, unjust or discriminatory treatment, or intervene to try to get a fairer outcome for you. Phone 1300 362 072 or for links to state, territory and industry ombudsman offices go to www.ombudsman.gov.au

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) investigates complaints about inappropriate content on broadcasting services such as the television and radio. Complaints should be made to the owner or provider of the service first. If the complaint is not resolved, go to www.acma.gov.au ACMA also investigates complaints about email SPAM and telemarketing calls, and maintains the “Do Not Call” register.

The Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner at www.esafety.gov.au provides information and resources to Australians about staying safe online. They also investigate complaints about cyberbullying and offensive and illegal online content.

If your child is being cyberbullied on the internet, or if you have come across online content you think is offensive or illegal, you can make a complaint at www.esafety.gov.au/complaints-and-reporting

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