Emergency services



In an emergency, telephone 000 for:

Police
Ambulance
Fire brigade

Emergencies, whether natural (such as bushfires, floods, storms or earthquakes) or nonnatural (such as chemical incidents, traffic accidents or major criminal acts of violence), can occur in any community without warning. You should call 000 if someone needs urgent help.

Calls to 000 (triple zero) are free and you can make them from any phone in Australia. Be prepared to say your name, where you are, and the type of service you need.

If you cannot speak English, first tell the operator what kind of help you need – say “Police”, “Ambulance” or “Fire” – and then say your language. You will be connected to an interpreter, so do not hang up. The interpreter will help you talk to the police, ambulance or fire service

If you are using a home telephone, the emergency services can find your location while the phone is in use, so do not hang up.

If you are using a smartphone, the Emergency+ app is available to download for free from the Google Store at https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.threesixtyentertainment.nesn or at http://www.triplezero.gov.au/Pages/EmergencySmartphoneApp.aspx

This helps provide your location information to emergency services.

For information about the 000 (triple zero) service (including in languages other than English) go to www.triplezero.gov.au
Police

In an emergency that requires assistance from police, telephone 000 and ask for the “Police”. Remember, do not hang up the telephone if you do not speak English – say your language and an interpreter will be connected.

For non-urgent matters, phone 13 1444 or your local police station, listed under ‘Police Stations’ in the White Pages. Police services are free.

The police aim to protect life and property in the community, prevent and detect crime, and preserve peace. The police may intervene in family issues where there is a domestic dispute or concern about physical, sexual or psychological abuse. Police are not connected to the
military forces. The police do not play a part in politics.

Ambulance

In an emergency, such as a serious illness or an injury that needs immediate medical assistance, phone 000 and ask for an “Ambulance”. Ambulances provide emergency transport to hospital and immediate medical attention. Remember, do not hang up the telephone if you do not speak English – say your language and an interpreter will be connected.

You may have to pay for using an ambulance depending on where you live, how far you travel by ambulance, the nature of your illness and whether you are eligible for a concession. Medicare does not cover ambulance costs, but some private health insurance and ambulance memberships do (see , Health and Wellbeing).

For medical matters that are not emergencies, see, Health and Wellbeing.

For more information:


Fire brigade

In an emergency where fire is a risk, such as a house fire or gas leak, phone 000 and ask for the “Fire brigade”. Remember, do not hang up the telephone if you do not speak English – say your language and an interpreter will be connected.

The fire brigade puts out fires, rescues people from burning buildings and helps in situations where gas or chemicals become a danger.

Fire services are free.

For information on how you can prevent fires and what to do if there is a fire, see , Civic Participation and your state or territory fire service website:

Natural disasters

If there is a natural disaster, such as a bushfire, flood or cyclone, state and territory government authorities coordinate emergency services. Volunteer services such as state and territory emergency services (SES) and rural fire services may assist professional fire, police and rescue services.

If there is a natural disaster, such as a bushfire, flood or cyclone, state and territory government authorities coordinate emergency services. Volunteer services such as state and territory emergency services (SES) and rural fire services may assist professional fire, police and rescue services.

You may be able to get help to recover from a natural disaster. Go to www.disasterassist.gov.au for more information.

All levels of government in Australia are prepared for natural disasters or emergencies. For more information, see your state or territory website:

Bushfires

A bushfire is a fire that burns in grass, bush or woodland and can threaten life, property and the environment. A bushfire can happen at any time of year but the risk is higher during the warmer months when bush, grass or scrub is drier. Fires can be very hot, intense and fastmoving. Thick smoke from the fire might make it difficult to see or breathe. Australia is known for the severity of its bushfires.

If you live in a fire-prone area, make a bush fire survival plan. This will help you make important decisions about what to do during a fire – like when to leave, what to take and what to do with animals.

For more information about bushfires, including how to prepare, contact your state or territory fire service listed in the table above.
Other emergency numbers

The White Pages lists emergency telephone numbers, including:

Threat of Terrorism

Australia is committed to preventing violent extremism. Violent extremism is the use or support of violence to achieve ideological, religious or political goals. Everyone can contribute to the security of Australia by being aware of and understanding the threat of violent extremism.

To find out more or report your concerns:

For more information please go to